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December 7, 2018- Sun just rising over campus on a chilly December morning.

December 16, 2018- Merry Kegmas!!! Beer keg Xmas tree outside Chittenden Ave bar Two Bucks.

December 19, 2018- This place on Indianola south of Chittenden is very impressive. Full of animatronics AND it plays Christmas music all the time!

December 29, 2018- Coal from Kentucky and West Virginia moving up the tracks at the eastern edge of the University District. In the past decade, coal had largely ceased being a cargo on the tracks. In the past year, it's returned. Not good. Not good at all. Not for any of us.

December 31, 2018- Seen on E Duncan St on New Year’s Eve.

January 13, 2019- Pearl Alley's closed south of 15th. Whole area's fenced-off right down to the doors of the Starbucks on 14th. Demolition of the buildings left is probably nigh.

January 20, 2019- Snowy Glen Echo Ravine with the old North High School in the background.

January 23, 2019- Historic Buckeye dentists taking a pause while the new $95 million dental school goes up. Willoughby Dayton Miller (1853–1907) in repose and John Ross Callahan (1853-1918) having a look. Statue of Miller was the first statue ever erected at Ohio State. Back in 1915. Oxley and Mack Halls in the background.

February 2, 2019- One late night back in 1984, after finishing off a night of revels with a stop by the High and Lane Burger King (where CVS is now), I was wending my way home when I encountered something completely unexpected. In the middle of the city, in the middle of the University District, there stood a log cabin. I had to retrace my steps the next day to confirm I had seen what I thought I’d seen.

Part of this over 215-year-old cabin was the home of David Beers. Beers was the first European to settle in the University District. He built his cabin in 1804 near Dodridge and High when the neighborhood was still dense forest, home to Wyandot and Shawnee, deer and wolves, owls and eagles. It was moved to its current site on E Norwich by circus star Conn Baker about 1904.

I am always amazed that something so old could still stand in a neighborhood and city marked by continual change.

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162 1/2 E 11th Ave. Thanks to division and subdivision of older homes, the neighborhood has a lot of 1/2 addresses.

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